The Sales Commandments According to This Disciple

About Carson Heady

Carson V. Heady is an American author and sales leader, best known for his 2010 sales/leadership book within a business conspiracy novel, "Birth of a Salesman."

Sales is a psychology; a profitable sport by which we engage clients, build relationships and seek the perfect balance for the holy sales trinity: customer, company and you.  Without all of these entities in mind, the transaction and stability suffers.

As a sales person you always need to be working on your craft and being innovative. Sometimes that will involve doing things outside of your comfort zone. At the end of the day it’s the innovation and creativity that separates you from the rest of the pack.

That said, there are certain fundamentals we must ingrain in each and every leg of the sales process; without them, our process is defunct and the results will tell that story.  Remember: results do not define us, but they do not lie.  If there is a breakdown in your process, your results will be broken, too.

  1. BE PROACTIVE AND THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX.  A major area of opportunity of many salespeople is their predisposition of wanting to follow the leaders or be like others; fit in, follow the beaten path.  But why be like everyone else?  That makes one average.  Blaze your own trail.  Stand out.  Reach out for more customers; do not just accept the low-hanging, less challenging fruit.  Don’t get me wrong: you pick up every bit of fruit you can find – small or big.  Nevertheless, always think of innovative ways to put yourself in front of new clients.  Like a billboard on a busy freeway, be where your customers are looking and show them why you’re the one they need to pay attention to.  Doing so puts you in position to guide the process.  Not doing so puts the customer in control and your paycheck and career are in their hands.
  2. LISTEN.  Salespeople often ask me how to overcome certain objections, but they fail to realize that if they had set the right foundation they would be using the customers’ own words in the presentation, the close and any necessary overcomes.  Your words and philosophies pale in comparison in the customers’ minds to their own; listen and learn their language so you can speak it.  Find out what you need to know from the customer so you can diagnose their situation; where do the gaps lie?  How can you plug those gaps?  How are you going to make them realize that jettisoning their comfortable, familiar ways of doing business and going with you is going to be better?  You can’t get there unless your ears perk up and you get them doing the talking.

    The most important part of the sales process is to put the customer first by listening. If you ask the right questions they will lead you down a path allowing you to make a recommendation based on what your product can offer them. As you follow-up you that let them know your call is to help them accomplish their goals, not just sell a seat location.

  3. REACT.  React to everything, and know when to use your information.  You can be the smartest person in the room – great.  However, if you are simply unloading jargon and facts on your potential client, are you showing them why your way of doing business is better?  Knowledge is power, but knowing when and how to use it is even more effective.  Improve your pitch, but perfect your reaction.  If you role play, don’t practice improbable scenarios; get used to setting the right foundation and knowing how to react to every objection your client throws at you.  See objections before they happen and address potential hitches before your customer even can.  You will see many customers, but only a few themes; master those themes and there’s no slipping one by your goalie.
  4. FOLLOW UP.  Unfortunately, no matter how effective a closer you are, the sale will not always happen on your timetable.  Don’t get me wrong: you need to do everything you can to build trust and determine why specifically the customer is not doing business today.  But if they leave the table for a viable reason, you must have an organized, prompt and thorough follow up process in place.  Customers will “browse” or “do research” and finally get tired enough to do business and pay more elsewhere if you do not stay front and center in their universe.  Follow up within 24 hours to a week and reignite the lead.  You cannot win them all, but you can nurture them all to as close to completion as possible.  That’s your job.  If you can look back on every transaction and know you did everything you could to earn the business, you did your job.  Congratulations.
  5. MASTER THE GAME.  There are ups and downs; when you’re up, ride the wave.  When you’re down, make sure you behave – according to process, that is.  You may get the shanks in your golf game or your baseball hitting suffers, but do you drastically change your swing to get back to desired results?  Of course not.  You have to envelop yourself in the process.  You also must learn the playing field – how can you make money where you currently are not?  What best practices are others using?  Steal them shamelessly; those who execute best are the best.

Finally, refresh and recharge often.  You need to make sure you are the person you were on interview day.  Play for the love of the game, the adoration of the crowd and the benefit of the customer and you will be victorious.

 

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email